FIELD OPERATIVE

CALL OF DUTY, BATTLEFIELD & F.P.S. blog

MEDAL OF HONOR CAMPAIGN REVIEW (XBOX 360) – part#2

Having spent approximately 2.000 hours playing the onling multiplayer, single player, split-screen and co-op modes of the latest three Call Of Duty games (COD4, COD:WaW, MW2) as well as Battlefield: Bad Company 2, I am what you can call a military F.P.S. enthusiast. When a good new game comes out, I generally start by the single player campaign and won’t play anything else until I’ve finished it. I cannot yet comprehend how Danger Close fucked MEDAL OF HONOR’s single player so bad, that it failed to excite me even the slightest.

  • Closing part#1 of this review, I was hoping to get more excited by my second single-player session. There was little chance to achieve that starting with a generic, dull sequence where you must mark down enemy vehicles for aerial support. The overall view of the village is UGLY, the explosions are UGLY, and how much excited can you be by a years old mechanic?
  • Then there was this  ATV sequence. Driving vehicles is messy and certainly not precise. Comparing this vehicle session with Modern Warfare 2’s,  BFBC2’s or whatever Halo’s is a disgrace. Why put them in the game then? Because they had to, I guess. Kids want to do a little driving now and then, don’t they?
  • When the gameplay moved mountain-side, graphics got a little better but they’re still very average. Reading the single player previews and having been carried away by Uncharted 2, I expected some stunning vistas. Not really.
  • Something that I haven’t mentionned before is that I played in Hard difficulty mode, yet there was not any real challenge. Medal Of Honor is very easy.

Failing to find anything interesting, continuing playing even for the achievements, was getting masochistic, so I stopped. Medal Of Honor’s single player campaign is pathetic trying to imitate Call Of Duty and being technically unpolished. I am astonished with how a major games publisher can neglect so much Q.A. There is no excuse that all those scripting issues and other bugs that whoever is able to isolate in a couple of hours, have not been corrected during a development cycle of nearly two years…

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